Monday, August 3, 2015

Bridge of the Gods | Half Marathon and 10K Run

Join the Bridge of the Gods Half Marathon and 10K Run on Sunday, August 16th in Cascade Locks, OR. This Half Marathon and 10K Run crosses 4 bridges, creeks and with thick shaded canopy covering parts of this scenic pathway participants will stay cool under the hot August sun. Read details about this Bridge of the Gods Half Marathon and 10K Run below.
Packet Pickup Locations. We are excited to announce three packet pickup locations for this year's Bridge of the Gods Run. Our partners The North Face and Thunder Island Brewing will be hosting packet pickups at their locations. First packet pickup will be Friday August 14th from 3-8PM at The North Face Portland location at 1202 NW Davis, Portland Oregon 97209. Second packet pickup will be on Saturday August 15th between 4-7PM at Thunder Island Brewing located at 515 NW Portage Way, Cascade Locks, Oregon. Day of race packet pickup will be in front of the Cascade Locks School between 5:30-7 AM at 300 Wa Na Pa Street, Cascade Locks, Oregon. We are less than three weeks from race day. More updates coming this week. We are so excited!
SRC: Learn how to register for the 2015 Bridge of the Gods Half Marathon and 10K Run at: bridgeofthegodsrun.com/

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

45th Anniversary of Vortex I | A “biodegradable festival of life.”


Celebrate the 45th Anniversary of Vortex I, the only state sponsored rock festival in U.S. history on August 8th, 2015. Vortex I: A Biodegradable Festival of Life, took place at a state park near Estacada in 1970. Learn how Vortex was different than a counter-culture music event below.
Entry was free. Private businesses in Portland contributed much of the food, supplies and building materials. Law-enforcement officers kindly escorted hundreds of young people to the festival location at McIver State Park. Yet no laws were enforced on the park grounds themselves. And all of this was endorsed and underwritten with state money and services by the Republican governor, Tom McCall.  
OPB’s “Vortex I” portrays the political environment which spawned the festival and shares many stories from the people who were there. 

SRC: Learn more about this history of Vortex I at: www.opb.org/television/programs/oregonexperience/segment/vortex-i/

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

2015 Melges 24 US National Championships


Drive over to Cascade Locks for the 2015 Melges 24 US National Championships on August 7th, 8th and 9th. This Columbia River regatta is open to all boats that meet the obligations of the Melges 24 Class rules and USMCA rules, including class membership. Registration is still open if your available for a great time on the water in Cascade Locks on August 7th, 8th and 9th. Learn more about the 2015 Melges 24 US National Championships, below.
The 2015 CSR Marine Melges 24 National Championship is almost here and in anticipation of what is going to be one of the most fun regattas ever, the Corinthian Division is steady growing. Already ten teams have cleared the qualification process. Many, many more are expected to join the ranks of what potentially will be the largest ever all-amatuer Melges 24 National Championship fleet on the North American continent this year.
SRC: Register for the 2015 Melges 24 US National Championships at: www.regattanetwork.com/event/9441#_registration

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

World War II Stories on the Columbia River


Join the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum on August 20th for Oregon Transformed: World War II Stories on the Columbia River. The Oregon Transformed event is free to the public with an optional pre-program dinner (only $15 per person) including Jerked chicken sliders, cole slaw, corn on the cob, potato salad and peach pie. The dinner begins at 6 p.m. and the WWII Stories on the Columbia River begins at 7 pm on August 20th, 2015. Read details about this event below.
Oregon Transformed: World War II Stories on the Columbia River, takes a look at the impact of WWII on the communities and landscape of the Columbia River Gorge area. This is a panel discussion with speakers Dr. Linda Tamura, Dr. William Lang, and Dr. Carl Abbott.
The “Oregon Transformed” series considers long-term impacts of World War II in local regions around the state within broad thematic frameworks. Presenters in The Dalles will address the themes of “consent and dissent” and “revisions to the landscape” by discussing subjects including the return of Nisei Japanese-American soldiers after the war; the commitment to USACE “Main Control Plan,” leading directly to The Dalles Dam, the environmental challenges to post-war aluminum industry over fluoride emissions; and Hanford and Richland “planned communities.” Panelists will offer prepared presentations, leaving plenty of time for audience questions and discussions.
Questions about her family heritage led Linda Tamura, author and Professor of Education Emerita at Willamette University, to write about Japanese Americans during World War II and how her community responded. Carl Abbott is Professor Emeritus of Urban Studies and Planning at Portland State University and the author of several books on the history of the American West. Dr. William L.  Lang is Emeritus Professor of History at PSU and a member of Oregon Historical Society’s Board of Trustees.
This program is presented in association with the Oregon Historical Society’s exhibit WWII: A World at War, A State Transformed and is presented in partnership with the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum.
The program is free and open to the public

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

SRC: Reserve your seat for Oregon Transformed: World War II Stories on the Columbia River at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum at: www.gorgediscovery.org/discover/featuredevent/event-calendar/

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Columbia River Gorge Heat Advisory


Its hot, so hot that we have a heat advisory from Battlefield, WA to Eugene, OR and everywhere in between. High temperatures are expected to hit between 95F to 100F throughout the Willamette Valley as well as the Western and Central Columbia River Gorge area. Learn how long this heat is expected to last by reading the Heat Advisory below.
... HEAT ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM WEDNESDAY TO 9 PM PDT FRIDAY FOR THE WILLAMETTE VALLEY AND WESTERN AND CENTRAL COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE...
A HEAT ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM WEDNESDAY TO 9 PM PDT FRIDAY.
* TIMING: WEDNESDAY THROUGH AT LEAST FRIDAY.
* UNCERTAINTY: 90F TEMPERATURES MAY PERSIST INTO THE WEEKEND... WITH THE HOTTEST TEMPERATURES LIKELY IN THE CENTRAL COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE AND SOUTHERN WILLAMETTE VALLEY.
* HIGH TEMPERATURES: 95F TO 100F.
* LOW TEMPERATURES: 55F TO 65F.
* LOCATIONS INCLUDE: EUGENE... SPRINGFIELD... CORVALLIS... ALBANY... SALEM... MCMINNVILLE... HILLSBORO... PORTLAND... OREGON CITY... GRESHAM... VANCOUVER... BATTLE GROUND... WASHOUGAL... ODELL
* IMPACTS: DO NOT LEAVE CHILDREN AND PETS UNATTENDED IN AUTOMOBILES.
SRC: Learn ways to take extra precautions during this Heat Advisory at: www.cgsentinel.com/v2_news_articles.php?heading=0&story_id=7358&page=72

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Western Pond Turtles let loose in the Columbia River Gorge


The population of Western Pond Turtles has grown in the Columbia River Gorge, thanks to the Western Pond Turtle Recovery Project. The program started in the early 1990's when there were less than 100 Western Pond Turtles in Washington, according to the Oregon Zoo. According to a district wildlife biologist at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, there are now as may as 800 turtles in four different populations in the Columbia River Gorge. Learn why the Western Pond Turtle Recovery Project in the Columbia River Gorge has not declared victory yet by reading more about the turtle's hurtles below.
Almost 25 years in, the Western Pond Turtle Recovery Project has been a success by most accounts. But is there an end point? Can the effort ever declare victory?
"With any species recovery program, the goal is a self-sustaining animal population without human intervention," Cutting said.
Western pond turtles in the Gorge aren't there yet, Anderson said. One target is having four separate populations of at least 200 animals, he said. The four current populations — three in Skamania County, one in Klickitat County — haven't reached that level yet. And there are other considerations than just numbers, Anderson said.
"We want to have an evenly distributed number of younger and older turtles in the population," Anderson said.
The program has helped the species rebound in the region by plucking hatchling turtles from the wild, then raising them for 11 months in the safe confines of captivity. With controlled summer-like conditions year-round, the animals feed and grow faster than they normally would. When the juvenile turtles are large enough to fend for themselves, they're released back into the wild.
The Oregon Zoo and Woodland Park Zoo take the role of raising the animals while they're in captivity. The task of monitoring and tracking the turtles falls to WDFW, Anderson said.
The turtles' survival rates have been very high after release, according to the Oregon Zoo. But some mortality is inevitable. Among the biggest threats to the turtles are predators like bullfrogs and loss of habitat — likely the main reasons their numbers declined in the first place, U.S. Forest Service spokesman Leanne Veldhuis said in an email.
The turtles have also had to cope with disease, Anderson said. WDFW officials earlier this month trapped and evaluated some turtles affected by a disease that creates small lesions on the shell, he said.
WDFW also conducts periodic population estimates as part of its monitoring efforts, Anderson said. Turtles are often marked so they can be identified and observed at later visits.
If the population were declared healthy, officials would go through a de-listing process to remove the western pond turtle as a threatened species.
SRC: Read the entire article about Western Pond Turtles let loose in the Columbia River Gorge at: www.columbian.com/news/2015/jul/26/turtle-program-slow-steady-columbia-river-gorge/

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Rock of Ages Loop Hike


When you need an intense hike with some major elevation gain in the Columbia River Gorge, head over to the Rock of Ages Loop Hike. This hike begins at the Horsetail Falls Trailhead which is not far from Multnomah Falls. After a sharp bend in the trail and before hitting Ponytail Falls there'll be a non-maintained entry trail for the Rock of Ages Loop Hike. This hike is not for beginners and should be hiked with caution. The breath taking views of the Columbia River Gorge will be well worth your efforts. Learn details about this trail below.
Rock of Ages and Saint Peter's Dome are two large rock formations standing like Roman soldiers guarding Yeon Mountain in the Columbia River Gorge. While there is no well-worn trail down to either of the formations themselves, the Rock of Ages hike offers some unique perspectives these basaltic domes, while taking you to three lesser-known but worthwhile viewpoints in the Gorge.
This is a primitive, but well-worn trail along a steep, non-maintained path. Parts of the hike are scrambles with some exposure and hikers should be cautioned in less than optimum weather conditions. At about a 1000ft/mile the first stretch of this hike rivals any in the Gorge in terms of difficulty. 
SRC: Find detailed directions for the Rock of Ages Loop Hike at: www.oregonhikers.org/field_guide/Rock_of_Ages_Loop_Hike

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here