Friday, July 29, 2016

Horsetail, Ponytail & Triple Falls


Walk behind waterfalls on this triple waterfall hike! Perfect for the summer this hike features three different waterfalls, in one awesome trail. 4.4 miles total this is a great way to get some energy out of the kids!
This is a quintessential western Gorge hike - 3 sparkling waterfalls (one in which you get to walk behind!), several outstanding Gorge views, and one unique Oneonta Gorge slot canyon all packed in 2.2 miles (one way)! 
Begin the hike next to 176-ft Horsetail Falls and climb along a mossy slope of ferns. At .2 miles, turn right onto the Gorge Trail taking you to 80-ft Ponytail Falls in which you get to walk behind! Linger here to enjoy the dancing of the falls' spray. 
Beyond the falls in .4 miles you'll come to several trails to the right. They lead to several outstanding viewpoints at the cliffs edge, high above the river. Be careful to not get to close to the edge.  
Continue on the main trail another .4 miles, crossing over a metal footbridge above 60-ft Oneonta Falls. Quickly you'll arrive at a junction with the Oneonta Trail. Turn left here to Triple Falls, .9 miles up the trail, making for a perfect lunch spot. 
Turn around and head back the way you came to complete this out-and-back 4.4 mile hike. 
Learn more at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/horsetail-ponytail-triple-falls.html


Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Multnomah And Wahkeena Falls Loop


This longer but fairly easy hike is great for those looking to see more waterfalls in the Columbia River Gorge. Family friendly, this 4.8-mile hike has an elevation gain of 1540 ft but is worth every beautiful step.
For the most waterfalls on a moderate hike, this loop can't be beat! It encompasses towering Multnomah Falls, rapids and smaller falls of Multnomah Creek, and the tumbling, gradual descent of Wahkeena Creek. A very popular trail; the best time to go is during the spring when the falls are at their best. 
  
The loop can be completed in either direction, starting at Wahkeena or Multnomah Falls trailheads. Starting at Multnomah Falls will get you past the crowds first. After a steep climb of nearly a mile and 11 switchbacks on a paved trail, the trail splits, with the paved way continuing out to Multnomah Falls viewpoint. Take a look from the top of the falls, and then continue on the loop by following the Larch Mountain Trail. It turns left at the top of the ridge (where the branch to the top of the falls went right) and immediately crosses a bridge to the west bank of Multnomah Creek. 
  
The next 0.8 miles along this trail passes a series of smaller waterfalls. Along the creek, as at other places in the Gorge, you're likely to see water ouzel, bobbing their legs and diving beneath the fast-flowing water. This is a beautiful section of trail. 
  
You will come to a signed intersection with the Wahkeena Trail #420, which turns off to the right, leading west towards the Wahkeena Creek basin. Turn right here and continue uphill out of the Multnomah valley. Just don't forget to look around behind you. The view up Multnomah Creek is wonderful; the narrow valley framed by tall firs covered in moss.
Learn more about this great hike and a=some of the history of Multnomah Falls at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/multnomah---wahkeena-falls-loop.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Bell Creek Loop Hike


Are you looking for a challenge this summer? Have a fitness goal you are looking to break? Bell Creek Loop Hike is perfect for that! This expert level hike is 14.5 miles long with an elevation gain of 3330 ft! Be surrounded by beautiful forest scenery and view waterfalls the Columbia River Gorge is known for, all while setting a fitness goal!
Begin at on the Oneonta Trail #424 and climb to the junction with Gorge Trail #400. The trail reaches a shelf above the Columbia River where viewpoints are accessible on a side-trail. Pass a junction to the Horsetail Falls Trail (#438), then continue on to Triple Falls, followed by the bridge over Oneonta Creek. 
  
The trail continues alongside the creek past another bridge. Turn left on Horsetail Creek Trail (#425) and come to the Oneonta Creek ford. After crossing the creek, switchback up about 20 times in 2.3 miles, and turn right on Bell Creek Trail (#459). Pass through three miles of forest and wetlands until you reach the junction with Oneonta Trail (#424). Turn right and keep to trail #424, bypassing a few other junctions, and pass Oneonta Canyon to complete the loop. 
Learn more about this great hike at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/bell-creek-loop.html


Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Changes Late Summer Salmon Fishing


This summer there will be changes to the late summer salmon fishing. If you plan on fishing in the Columbia River tributaries, these changes will come into effect August 1st.

Fall salmon regulation changes begin Monday, Aug. 1, and with the forecasted reduced coho run size, anglers will be limited to two hatchery adult coho – which was previously six fish – on all tributaries to the Lower Columbia River.
They include: Deep River; mainstem Grays River including West Fork; Elochoman River; Cowlitz River; Toutle River; North Fork Toutle River; Green River (Cowlitz County); Tilton River; Cispus River; Kalama River; Lewis River including North Fork; Washougal River; and Klickitat River.
In an effort to remove stray hatchery fish from the spawning grounds, for the first time ever hatchery chinook and hatchery coho will be allowed to be retained during hatchery steelhead seasons.
They include: Delemeter Creek; Olequa Creek; Stillwater Creek; Lacamas Creek (Lewis County); Salmon Creek (Lewis County); Outlet Creek (Cowlitz County); South Fork Toutle River; Blue Creek (Lewis County) from mouth to posted sign above rearing pond outlet; Mill Creek (Lewis County) from mouth to hatchery road crossing culvert; East Fork Lewis River from mouth to 400 feet downstream of Horseshoe Falls; Salmon Creek (Clark County) from mouth to 182 Ave.; Little Washougal River; West (North) Fork Washougal River; Hamilton Creek; Lower Rock Creek (Skamania County) from mouth to falls; and White Salmon River from county road bridge upstream to 400 feet below Big Brother Falls.
Learn more about the regulation changes at: www.seattletimes.com/sports/lots-of-changes-looming-in-late-summer-salmon-fisheries-along-tributaries-of-the-columbia-river/

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Monday, July 25, 2016

Upper McCord Creek Falls


Upper McCord Creek Falls is a wonderful trail for a summer day in The Gorge! Come see the beautiful double falls and the wonderful views and forest scenery!
This hike begins at the same location as the Nesmith Point and Elowah hikes. Follow trail #400 along an abandoned road and up a steep incline, where you will come across a junction. Bear right and follow the trail uphill toward McCord Creek Falls. After a few switchbacks, the view will open up to great vistas of the Gorge and Mt. Adams. The trail is cut into the wall and has railings for safety. You will see Elowah Falls from the top, just before entering the forest and coming to McCord Creek Falls. This is a remarkable double falls and well worth the trip. Note that sometimes on dry summer days, only one falls may be flowing. 
Learn more about this hike at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/upper-mccord-creek-falls.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Friday, July 22, 2016

Barnyard Concerts in Troutdale


Join the Troutdale Historical Society for a Barnyard Concert at the Harlow House Park along the Historic Columbia River Highway. Enjoy a Barnyard Concert on Friday, August 5th and again on Friday, September 2nd, 2016. Listening to free music near the Sandy River while the sun sets is a beautiful way to start your weekend. Learn more about Troutdale's Barnyard Concerts below.
The Barnyard concert will be on the back lawn of Harlow House Park, 732 E. Historic Columbia River Highway, next door to the Barn Exhibit Hall, featuring an exhibit on the Historic Columbia River Highway. The highway exhibit will be open for the evening. The concert is free and guests should bring a blanket or chairs.
Jere Hudson plays with local bands Possum Six-Pack and Biere Malheureux. Zach also calls square dances.

The society plans two more concerts on Troutdale's First Fridays, Aug. 5 and Sept. 2, featuring singer Tom Arbuckle. All events are free.
SRC: Learn more about Troutdale's Barnyard Concerts at: www.troutdalehistory.org/events.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Wahkeena Falls


This beautiful trail is great easy hike for the family this summer! Waterfalls and bridges and beautiful scenery this almost 3 mile hike is a great excursion for the family!
This beautiful trail starts by crossing a wooden bridge over Wahkeena Creek. Be sure to head right here; the trail to the left leads to Multnomah Falls. The trail climbs to a stone bridge at the base of Wahkeena Falls, where spray on the trail here is year-round. In the winter, this can get very icy. The trail then starts up a steep section, climbing about 400 feet in half a mile. At the top of this first climb, you'll crest a ridge. Follow the pavement out to the point, called Lemmon's Viewpoint. Return the route you ascended. 
Learn more at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/wahkeena-falls.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Elowah Falls Hike


Elowah Falls is a longer hike with beautiful views and a gorgeous waterfall that make it worth the trek out. Appropriate for beginning hikers this trail is a great idea for a day trip to the Gorge!
At Elowah Falls, McCord Creek crashes into a huge amphitheater made up of several distinct lava flows. This is a fairly easy hike, appropriate for most beginners, leading to a 289-foot waterfall. There is a small amount of climbing involved, with a summit in the middle of the hike. Follow the trail from the parking area up to junction, veer left to lower trail. 
Learn more at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/elowah-falls.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Multnomah Falls Franklin Ridge Loop


For those who want a little longer and more challenging of a hike at Multnomah, the Franklin Ridge loop is a great idea. Featuring multiple waterfalls, beautiful scenic views of the Gorge, and lovely forest landscape. 12 miles long, this is a great idea for a day trip to the Gorge!
Start at the Multnomah Falls Trailhead. Hike to the top of Multnomah Falls and continue up Multnomah Creek. Turn left at the Franklin Ridge junction, and follow the trail through a variety of forest covers and seasonal wildflowers to the junction to Oneonta Gorge. After descending into Oneonta Gorge, follow Oneonta Creek past Triple Falls and to a junction. Here, you can decide to complete the hike one-way by taking the route to Horsetail Falls and Ponytail Falls, or continue on Gorge Trail #400 back to Multnomah Falls. 
Learn more about this great hike and some of the history of Multnomah at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/multnomah-falls---franklin-ridge-loop.html

Use the new Columbia Gorge express to get there! Learn more at: columbiagorgeexpress.com/

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Monday, July 18, 2016

McMenamins Edgefield Winery


McMenamins Edgefield Winery is one of the great additions to this stop in the Gorge. Started in 1990 this winery made in house features Northwest tastes. 
Founded in 1990, McMenamins Edgefield Winery crafts a diverse assortment of wines and ciders for our family of pubs and neighborhood gathering spots. The winery is nestled in the cellar of the historic Edgefield manor, where patrons, wine tanks, barrels, and nightly musical entertainment form a lively, interactive and intimate atmosphere.
The winery offers a wide selection of varietals representing the best of the Northwest: bold Washington Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah, elegant Oregon Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, aromatic Pinot Gris and Riesling, and distinctive rosé, sparkling and fortified dessert wines.
Learn more about Edgefield's Winery at: www.edgefieldwinery.com/About-Our-Winery/About

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Friday, July 15, 2016

Sheppard's Dell Falls


Sheppard's Dell Falls is a great little stop along the Historic Highway. The waterfall can be hard see because of the land around it, but it is worth the stop.
History 
We owe our thanks to a modest farmer who gave us his "dell." George Shepperd was a transplanted Canadian farmer who moved his family to the Gorge in the 1880s, settling on a 160-acre land claim along Young Creek, just west of the mill town of Bridal Veil. He supported his family by farming, dairying and working at the nearby Bridal Veil Lumber Mill. 
  
In the early 1900s, HCRH engineer and designer Samuel Lancaster began surveying a possible highway route through the Gorge. Travel in the Gorge at that time was mostly by train, and the Shepperd farm was one of the many stops along the route. No record of a meeting between Shepperd and Lancaster exists, but George was described as an early supporter of the highway, and this is surely the time when he realized that he could be part of Lancaster's grand vision. 
  
Newspaper accounts show that Shepperd had many opportunities to sell his property for substantial profit, as the new highway was quickly dotted with roadhouses and gift shops aimed at the new stream of tourists. The Oregonian later reported: "ever since the highway was constructed, Mr. Shepperd has received offers to purchase the tract, but has refused them, having in mind an intention to dedicate the property to the use of the public." In March 1914, George Shepperd's land donation along Young Creek was announced as part of the construction of the Columbia River Highway and deeded to the City of Portland which was later transferred its present owner, Oregon State Parks.
Learn more at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/shepperds-dell-falls.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Larch Mountain Trail Loop


Larch Mountain Trail Loop is a great hike for those looking for a little bit more challenge. At a 6 mile loop this will certainly make your calves burn and you breathe short but the views and forest scenery really make this trail worth it.
This hike starts at the Larch Mountain Trailhead (#441), at the southwest corner of the parking lot. This area of the Columbia Gorge trails is one of the few open to mountain bikes, although it doesn't seem to see a lot of use. You'll start by passing through a campground, then drop down somewhat steeply through a dense forest, and cross a closed road and a large campsite. 
Two miles down, turn right on to the Multnomah Creek Way Trail (#444). Continue down to a log bridge over Multnomah Creek, 0.2 miles from the trail junction. Just across the bridge, take Multnomah Creek Spur Trail (#446), then stay to the right and continue on Multnomah Creek Way Trail (#444), traveling upstream. Pass through an area that was once a lake, but has filled in with natural sediments to create a wetland. 
The trail continues up switchbacks to the crater wall and an old logging railroad grade. It continues on about one mile to a junction with Oneonta Trail (#424); turn right and head up Oneonta Trail (#424) for almost a mile to Larch Mountain Road. Turn right here and hike up the road for 0.3 of a mile to your car. 
Learn more about this great trail at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/larch-mountain-crater-loop.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

100th Anniversary For First Campground In The U.S


This month marks the 100th Anniversary of Oxbow Park Campgrounds, which also happen to be the first developed campgrounds in the U.S.! Come stay in this place of history and beauty surrounded by waterfalls and hikes.
The campground is now part of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. The waterfall-rich Eagle Creek Trail departs from the south end of the area en route to Punchbowl Falls and other scenic cascades along Eagle Creek.
"Our research has confirmed that Eagle Creek was the first Forest Service "developed" campground (aka not just an impromptu "dispersed" camp) in the United States," Rachel Pawlitz with the USDA Forest Service explaind. "We define that by some key elements that Forest Service specifically put in place for visitors, including the first flush toilet in the Forest Service (then known as a "comfort station"), parking areas, picnic tables, fireplace/cookstoves, a trail and trail register, and a ranger station with the first resident ranger at a campground. These were developed at the urging of Portland's civic leaders, in conjunction with the Historic Columbia River Highway to provide recreational experiences to visitors."
The National Park Service wasn't created until later in the year 1916. The Bureau of Land Management did not come into existence until 1946.
"We have not found any specific evidence of developed campgrounds on National Parks that predate this, although there is a Forest Service thesis that mentions the use of 'campgrounds' at Yellowstone," Pawlitz explained. "We were delighted when we finally realized what a historic treasure we have in the Scenic Area."
Learn more at: kval.com/outdoors/oregons-eagle-creek-celebrates-a-century-of-camping

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Nesmith Point


This hike is among the most challenging in The Gorge but it has one of the best views you can get of the Gorge. You can even to walk out to a basalt rock cropping to get a view of most of the Columbia River Gorge. Beautiful views and forest scenery and a difficult, this a great hike for someone looking for a challenge in The Gorge with a breathtaking reward.
The vista from Indian Point is literally breathtaking, as the viewpoint sits on a spine of loose basalt that juts out from sheer cliff walls with big drop-offs. It’s reminiscent of Mitchell Point (a close second in terms of breathtaking Gorge views), but with a more enjoyable, albeit strenuous hike. According to Friends of the Columbia Gorge, the hike is a 7.6-mile lollipop loop with 2,800 feet of elevation gain, and is considered difficult. Also, if you have a problem with heights, this probably isn’t the trip for you.
The trail begins at the Herman Creek Trailhead, located just past the campground (closed indefinitely due to root rot that created hazard trees in the area) off of Frontage Road. From Hood River, head west on Interstate 84 to exit 47, head under the overpass and then drive west on Frontage Road until you arrive at the entrance to the campground and trailhead. You will need a Northwest Forest Pass.
The hike starts on Herman Creek Trail and winds through a forest of firs and ferns. At the beginning of the hike, you may notice the temperature drop all of a sudden, as cool winds are exhaled from a little underground cave visible from the side of the trail. Continue on the trail for a little over a mile until you arrive at a junction with Gorton Creek Trail and the Gorge 400 Trail. You’re pretty much in the trees for the whole time, but you’ll get a couple nice peek-a-boo views of the cliffs that rise up from Herman Creek.
Once you get to the junction, continue on the Herman Creek Trail, and then turn left onto the Nick Eaton trail. This is where the slog really begins, but eventually the hike will pop out of the trees and get a great view down the west side of the Gorge toward Bonneville Dam and get an equally great view of the Herman Creek drainage area. At this point, you can even see the very top of Mount Hood poking out from above the hills.
Keep heading up until you reach the junction with Nick Eaton Ridge Cutoff Trail, and head left for less than mile down to the Gorton Creek Trail (you also could have headed up the Gorton Creek Trail for a more gradual hike if you wanted). At the T, take a right onto Gorton Creek Trail until you see a small and steep footpath winding down to the point itself.
Use caution and only do what you’re comfortable with when accessing the point. The rocks may look stable, but many of them are not and will shift underfoot. I only went out just far enough to get a view of the Gorge. You can see Mount Adams, Mount St. Helens, and are looking right out at Carson and Home Valley. To the west, drink in the sheer basalt cliff faces and look past Bonneville Dam, look east and watch the traffic from I-84 buzz far below, with views that go all the way down the Gorge past Hood River.
Learn more about this great hike at: www.hoodrivernews.com/news/2016/jul/09/gorge-explorer-indian-point-climb-high-birds-eye-v/

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Monday, July 11, 2016

Ristorante Di Pompello


If you are looking for a wonderful local family owned Italian Restaurant than look not further than Troutdale OR. Ristorante Di Pompello is a great place whether you are out with the family, or looking for a nice dinner for two.
Ristorante DiPompello is owned and operated by Saul and Ruby Pompeyo. This restaurant is the culmination of a lifelong dream of Saul’s; to open one of his own Italian Restaurants! Saul and Ruby work seven days a week in the restaurant, Ruby makes all the sauces fresh, from scratch, everyday and helps Saul in the kitchen as well.
After the Family restaurant was destroyed in the Mexico City earthquake, Saul was recruited to leave Mexico City and come to Portland to manage a downtown Italian Restaurant. After his initial experience in Portland, Saul opened several other Italian food places in Portland for other people. Saul finally decided it was time for him fulfill his lifelong dream and open his own restaurant. He chose to open it in Troutdale because of the small town family atmosphere in Troutdale and Gresham. He wants to know his customers as his friends and family. Because making friends is so important to him, he stresses food quality with every meal that is prepared. “We want to know everybody and have a relationship with our customers and provide the best food we possibly can” ~ Saul.Saul was raised in the Italian Food business. His father owned and operated an Italian Restaurant in Mexico City where Saul learned all aspects of the Italian Restaurant. In the summer time, as a child and teen, Saul would travel to his paternal grandmothers home on the Yucatan Peninsula. His Grandmother was a fantastic traditional Italian cook and constantly entertained many guests and relatives. Always at her side was Saul learning traditional Italian recipes from the finest; Grandma DiPompello. The name of the restaurant “DiPompello” is the the original Italian family name and serves as a memorial to Saul’s grandparents and underscores the value of family to Saul and Ruby.
Learn more about this family business and check out their menu at: dipompello.com/about-dipompellos-italian-restaurant/

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Friday, July 8, 2016

Angel's Rest Hike

Angels Rest Hike is for those who are a little more comfortable hiking, but the views are absolutely amazing. 5 miles round trip this hike is a great way to get a look at the beautiful Columbia River Gorge.
This hike is a winding trail (#415) on the western end of the Columbia River Gorge that takes you up to great views. It starts at about river level and quickly climbs up through trees and then over boulders before rising to a bluff above the river.  From the top, you'll get a spectacular 270 degree view of the Gorge, including many landmarks like Beacon Rock and Silver Star Mountain. 
Learn more at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/angels-rest.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Troutdale 44th SummerFest


July 23rd is Troutdale's 44th Annual SummerFest. Come on down for fun activities all day long in Glenn Otto Park. With so many activities planned, you will be sure to have something fun to see and do!
Join us for Troutdale’s 44th Annual SummerFest on Saturday, July 23rd.
The event kicks off with a pancake breakfast and a display of cars, from back in the day and how they’ve changed throughout the years. Enjoy a community parade through Troutdale, chalk it up with your kids, and spend the day with family and friends in Glenn Otto Park. Also have fun with facepainting, an egg toss, water balloon toss, music, food from the community, a dunk tank, and pony rides!
Learn more about Troutdale's 44th SummerFest at: www.westcolumbiagorgechamber.com/event/summerfest-2016/


Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Bridal Veil Falls


If you are looking for a great family hike, Bridal Veil Falls is the one for you! This hike is a nice, quick and easy hike filled with beautiful scenery, views and of course the lovely Bridal Veil Falls.
This is a quick, but nice stroll for kids or less mobile hikers. The trail is paved, and all-access, circling the top of a bluff in Bridal Veil Park. There are beautiful views of the Columbia River, as well as a good look at the transportation routes in the area. Numerous historic markers explain Gorge history, geology and plant life.
Learn more about this great hike at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/bridal-veil-falls.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Kayak Tours

Have you always wanted to go kayaking, but never had the equipment or space to do so? Guided Kayaking Tours at Rooster Rock are for you then! A great family event, these tours are available for sunset and sunrise tours to see the beautiful Columbia River Gorge.
Join park rangers for a 2 to 2.5 hour guided paddle on a protected part of the gorgeous Columbia River.  We provide the kayaks, paddles, and PFDs.  We’ll teach you paddling basics such as strokes, gear selection, and paddle safety.
These tours are suitable for beginners.  Participants must be 8 years and older—youth must be accompanied by an adult, and youth 8 to 12 must paddle tandem with an adult.
Learn more about the tours and their dates at: columbiarivergorgeparks.wordpress.com/kayak-tours/

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Monday, July 4, 2016

Bell Creek Hike Loop

This loop is for the experienced hiker but it is well worth it. Beautiful forest and wetland scenery and waterfall views the Columbia Gorge is known for, this is a great way to spend a day.
Begin at on the Oneonta Trail #424 and climb to the junction with Gorge Trail #400. The trail reaches a shelf above the Columbia River where viewpoints are accessible on a side-trail. Pass a junction to the Horsetail Falls Trail (#438), then continue on to Triple Falls, followed by the bridge over Oneonta Creek. 
  
The trail continues alongside the creek past another bridge. Turn left on Horsetail Creek Trail (#425) and come to the Oneonta Creek ford. After crossing the creek, switchback up about 20 times in 2.3 miles, and turn right on Bell Creek Trail (#459). Pass through three miles of forest and wetlands until you reach the junction with Oneonta Trail (#424). Turn right and keep to trail #424, bypassing a few other junctions, and pass Oneonta Canyon to complete the loop. 
Get more information on this hike at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/bell-creek-loop.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here

Friday, July 1, 2016

Oneonta Gorge to Lower Oneonta Falls Hike

This interesting trail is great for summer time: There is no trail. The trail in the creek! Cool off at the Oneonta Gorge hike, and follow the creek up stream to see it's waterfall!
To reach Lower Oneonta Falls, walk up the creek bed, over a large and perhaps unstable log jam. Be very careful scrambling over this, especially with little ones! Continue walking through the incredible slot canyon through water up to your waist until you reach the waterfall. 
  
The trek to Lower Oneonta Falls has some very uneven footing but it's worth the challenge. It is fantastic on an August weekday to cool off with the cool refreshing water. Avoid on weekends since it is so busy. 
  
Please note:
  • The creek bed is very rocky; water shoes are recommended.
  • This trail is very busy on hot summer weekends. We recommend going during the week. You’ll appreciate the experience much more.
  • Do not attempt to climb the small cliff next to the falls and jump in the water. If you injure yourself in the Oneonta Gorge, you'll have a long wait before emergency personnel can get to you.
Learn more about this great hike at: gorgefriends.org/hike-the-gorge/oneonta-gorge-to-lower-oneonta-falls.html

Looking for lodging near the Columbia River Gorge? Check out Lodging Here